Welcome to Indiana’s Largest Pool of Untapped Talent

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Workers with disabilities are waiting to show your company what they can do. Are you ready to dive in?

 

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How To Name A Resume File

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Resume File Names Matter

When you are emailing your resume or uploading it to a job board, it is important to name the file correctly. You might only have one file on your computer named “Resume.doc”, but the HR manager will have hundreds. Your resume could get lost, or even accidentally replaced by another file with the same name.

Instead, include your full name in the file name. If you are only applying for jobs in one field or profession, consider putting that in the file name as well. So, your resume file name might end up “John_Smith_Resume.doc”, or “Jame_Smith_Journalist_Resume.pdf.”

Finally, note those file extensions: .doc and .pdf. Unless the employer requests something different, those are the only two file types you should use. You don’t want to miss out on a job because you sent your resume in a file they can’t open!

For more quick tips, browse the Career Resources menu above.

 

 

To Disclose Or Not? Discussing Your Disability with Job Interviewers and Possible Employers

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One issue that many job hunters with disabilities will face is disclosure. Should you inform a prospective employer about your disability? If so, when? While every situation is different, here are a few things to consider when making this important decision.

Of course, when you apply for a job through JobDoozy, employers come here looking to hire people with disabilities. However, the employer will not know the nature or extent of your disability, so choosing what and how much to disclose is still an issue.

Some people with disabilities may need reasonable accommodations to do a particular job. According to the US Department of Justice, a reasonable accommodation is a “modification or adjustment to a job or the work environment that will enable a qualified applicant or employee with a disability to participate in the application process or to perform essential job functions.”

For example, in order to work on a computer, someone who is blind might need their employer to provide screen reader software. In order to work as a bank teller, someone who uses a wheelchair may need their employer to lower a counter space.

If your employer is unaware of your disability, they have no legal obligation to provide you with a reasonable accommodation. If you need an accommodation to perform a job or to apply for one, you will need to disclose your disability at some point.

However, you do not have to disclose more information about your disability than necessary to make the case for the accommodation. For example, if you have low vision, you would have to disclose your disability for your employer to be obligated to provide you with a large print employee handbook, screen reader software, etc. However, you would not be obligated to tell them the exact medical cause of your low vision.

Job applicants and employees are not guaranteed to get every accommodation. There are several reasons why an employer might not be required to grant an accommodation. The two most common are: …Click to read more…